Monday, December 20, 2010

Begs the Question...

There are no jobs for most recent college graduates.  For many, its working the sales floor at GAP or waiting tables.

The U.S. Secretary of Education had this to say today:

"I think they need to go to the right college. I mean, this is all about choice," he said. "Whether it's a 4-year university, a 2-year college, trade, technical, vocational training, at the end of the day today, there are no good jobs out there if you just have a high-school diploma."
This is one of those Emperor Has No Clothes moments...

Maybe we are looking at this the wrong way (ever take one of those 8th grade graduations tests from the early 20th century?  Gives one a whole new sense of the "and my grandfather only had an 8th grade education" story). Maybe, just maybe... our primary and secondary educational systems need to be revamped prior to suggesting that kids take on the equivalent of a mortgage to go to school to get a degree in photography, art appreciation, women's studies, or massage therapy...  Of course, as long as the NEA and the Democratic party exist not much is going to get done by the government... maybe that's what's up with the increased interest in home schooling...  but just wait till the online delivery idea gains traction.

5 comments:

Dan said...

My great grandpa had a third grade education so he would have dropped out in 1916. Apparently at that time a third grade education meant you could read write and had your addition and multiplication tables down cold as well as fractions and percents. Today teachers rail against “drill kill” and universities have remedial courses on fractions. I can’t help but wonder if the deep thinkers in remedial (elementary) math ever ponder why they are where they are.

Dextred1 said...

Dan,

I like hearing about people's family, It is one of those things that make you understand the past. I only got one grand parent left and hope she will write a book for my kids so they know their history.

My Grandma was born in the late 20's. I think she made it to tenth grade. Her parents died a yr apart and left her to raise her 5 younger brothers and sisters to adulthood. Her youngest brother at the time was 2. She worked picking fields, a rosie riveter during the war, maid, etc to make ends meet. She married my dads father and had 5 kids and he was killed in a auto accident when the oldest was 7 or 8. Got remarried a second time and had one more daughter. In the days leading up to vietnam my great uncle johnny who was the 2 yr old was shot down over vietnam and killed and a few yrs later my dad's younger brother was killed in a auto accident. My Step grandpa and my grandma built a house cash and lived in the basement with 6 kids while they built the house above. If you can't tell they lived what we are most likely facin, no crying though. She was a tough old lady. They bought 15 acres with all sorts of fruit trees, a lot of cherry, some apple and pear trees and plenty enough room for some cattle, chicken, goats, pigs and other assorted beasts. When I was growing up I loved to have her around to help me do homework. I think she could spell anything and had so much knowledge it was kind of weird. She worked as the lead manager at a deli in a IGA and people literally came from all around to get the home cooked food she made there. Holidays were the best time to be around for the food she made. She could field dress a deer, plant fields, find mushrooms to eat(especially those tricky morel's) My point is that she was smart in the most inportant ways, survival!!!!
She died which is now almost 8 yrs ago, but she came from a time when you learned to survive. Not to mention she knew her history like no other. I have read that a 8 grade education then is similar to a college degree now. In my opinion I would place it's value even higher if that was the result. The best part is that she left all of her kids around 100,000 each. She was a very impressive lady to say the least. That is why I will never beleive in estate taxes bur and Donal. People work their whole life to leave just a little something so their children do not have it quite as hard.

Greg T. Jeffers said...

Dex:

What a woman!

Stephen B. said...

Dex, thanks for that. It'll give me inspiration all day!

Dextred1 said...

Thanks for the kind words